MyDecadeTV – One Heck Of A YouTube Aggregator

I’ve had lots of sobering thoughts lately about the up-and-coming generation that’s turning 18 after this Semper Reformanda 2017 year is in the history books.  Next year in 2018 we’ll have people turning 18 who were born in the year 2000, that have absolutely none of their lives in a part of history other than The New Millennium.  Besides the usual creeping decrepitude getting old stuff and possibility that someone who’s a teenager now had their childhood get wrecked by The Great Recession, if I transpose how my life has been onto that of someone born in 2000, things become a real eye-opener really quickly.

My earliest childhood memories start popping up in my mid single digits between when I was 5 and 7 years old.  For someone born in 2000, this means the following things have been a thing all their lives as far back as they can remember:

  • eTail instead of Retail being a viable way to buy things.
  • YouTube.
  • MP3 players and digital music.
  • Smartphones.
  • The whole mobile revolution.
  • Broadband Internet, depending on where they grew up.
  • The XBox 360 as their first console.
  • Dual core processors in computers.
  • The Intel Core series chips.

YouTube in particular is of note here.  In the early days of YouTube I and other YouTubers talked about how we “stopped watching TV and started watching YouTube.”  The rise of video-on-demand is entirely a thing with this generation, such that channel surfing may not be what it once was in previous generations.

Fortunately for the youngsters and whippersnappers who want to experience what channel surfing was like in the days when VCRs were the sum total of your video on demand options, there’s MyDecadeTV:

http://mydecadetv.com/

Basically this site is a giant aggregator of YouTube videos of content from the 70s, 80s, and 90s, set up to run like a virtual television back in those decades.  It’s actually a really neat project that’s piggybacking on YouTubers uploading their VHS tapes and turning the site into “The World’s VCR.”  🙂

The only real drawback here is that your channel surfing silently counts as part of your viewing history so consider using a different browser or something as this’ll mess with your recommended videos on your front page.  😀

Nonetheless though, it took a bit of a jolt to get me to realize that the experience of poking around looking for something to watch with no Netflix to go binge-watch might be something worth preserving in a historical project like this…  🙂

This is cool.  🙂  Pick a virtual TV, turn the TV on, flip channels or years, and experience what Video Entertainment was like in the bad old days before Netflix.  😀

By the way, I recommend using the full screen options and dropping your speakers down to midrange-only and stereo if you have a sound system.  🙂

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